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Finally: 2012 Super Bowl Ad Neuro-Rankings

Every year, we look forward to how the Super Bowl ads stacked up from a neuromarketing standpoint, courtesy of Sands Research. It’s taken a little longer this year, but the results are in! […]

By |May 15th, 2012|

NeuroBowl: Neuromarketing and Super Bowl 2012

The Super Bowl may be the biggest sports event of the year and the biggest advertising event of the year, but it’s also the biggest event of the year for neuromarketing companies. With $3 million being spent on every 30 second spot, you can be sure that lots of advertisers rang up their favorite neuromarketing firm to get a neuro-opinion on their ad approach. Super Bowl ad prices make an investment in a neuromarketing study look cheap. […]

By |February 3rd, 2012|

When Your Computer Watches Back

I frequently joke about journalists who use the term “Orwellian” to describe neuromarketing, but Orwell’s novel 1984 did foresee one technology that may become a reality: a television (or at least a monitor) that watches you back. The technology to have a webcam observe your facial expressions now exists, and may be deployed in ad platforms, games, and other areas. […]

By |November 23rd, 2011|

3D Commercials, Different Dynamics

3D entertainment has finally gone mainstream. Although three dimensional movies have existed for decades, they were largely gimmicky and had significant viewing problems. Now, James Cameron’s Avatar brought 3D to the big screen in a way that amazed audiences and convinced studio execs that the world was ready for 3D movies. Building on the Avatar buzz, 3D television sets were big news at the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show. With a surge in 3D entertainment, we can expect an onslaught of 3D advertisements to accompany the programming. Advertisers who start producing 3D commercials can’t assume that all they need to do is change out a standard camera for a 3D setup – eye tracking data shows that people who view the same scene in 3D vs. 2D look at different things. […]

By |March 10th, 2010|

Websites That Suck Increase Stress

We know that slow, balky, and confusing websites aren’t a good thing. Traffic metrics show this, as does conversion data. Google, whom some think of as passively indexing the web, believes quick-loading pages are essential to a good user experience. Google is, in fact, actively trying to speed up websites (and keep their search users happy) by making page load time a ranking factor. (See Barry Schwartz’s article at Search Engine Land describing Google’s Matt Cutts commentary at Pubcon.)

Now, neuroscience is underscoring the importance of quick-loading pages and easy to use web sites. A study sponsored by Computer Associates and conducted by Foviance, a customer experience consulting firm, showed that poorly performing websites demanded more user concentration and increased stress: […]

By |March 2nd, 2010|

Eye Tracking Shows Cultural Differences

East Asian subjects process a picture differently than their North American counterparts, according to a study published this week in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The study used both eye tracking and conventional survey techniques to show that the Asian subjects paid attention to the background of the image while the North Americans focused on the principal character. […]

By |March 11th, 2008|

Free Web Page Heat Maps?

The common belief is that neuromarketing is trying to find the mythical “buy button” in the brain. If you are an ecommerce web designer, though, the “buy button” is one thing you want to be sure your visitors can find very easily! One of the more reliable techniques for web designers has been using eye-tracking to generate visual attention “heat maps” like those created by my fellow Pubcon speaker Gordon Hotchkiss at Enquiro Research. The only problem with eye-tracking is that it takes specialized equipment and expertise, and hence may not be affordable for many websites. Wouldn’t it be great if the process could be automated, and performed for free on any web page? It sounds outlandish, but there’s a website that makes this claim. […]

By |March 7th, 2008|