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Behavioral Ads, Authorship Autopsy, Thought Leadership… Roger’s Picks

Here’s your required reading for the week! Don’t forget to share your own “must read” find in a comment! […]

By |August 29th, 2014|

Why You Are a Complete Idiot If You Don’t Google Yourself

The other day, I read a story at Fast Company titled Why You Should Google Yourself And Not Feel Guilty About It. I agreed with the reasoning of the author, Lindsay Lavine (@lindsaylavine), but was slightly puzzled by the “guilty” part. The headline was underscored by the opening sentence, “Admit it. You’ve Googled yourself, and probably felt guilty about it afterwards.”

Do people really feel guilt from self-Googling? Perhaps they do, as these kinds of searches have been called “vanity” searches, implying they are equivalent to stopping to admire yourself whenever you pass a mirror. […]

By |April 16th, 2014|

How to Turn a Thank You into Higher Sales, and More: Roger’s Picks

Here’s some of the interesting stuff we’ve gathered during the last 7 days… add your own find in a comment! […]

By |April 4th, 2014|

The Future of Web Design May Be Ugly

We’ve seen a variety of disastrous web design trends over the years. Remember splash pages? All-Flash sites? Frames? We may be on the cusp of a new trend: unstyled ugliness.
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By |February 4th, 2014|

Is Your Web Developer Planting Hidden Customer Experience Land Mines?

Is your web developer (or IT team) sabotaging your customer experience in ways that aren’t easily spotted?

You are likely already looking carefully at the pages, forms, content, and other visible elements to ensure that nothing is amiss there. But even when everything on the surface checks out fine, there may be hidden traps that your customers will encounter as they use your site. Think of them as web land mines, or CX-bombs.

Today, eliminating barriers to an awesome visitor experience is more important than ever. Your visitors have increasingly short attention spans, a low tolerance for frustration, and a plethora of alternatives. If they encounter something frustrating or confusing, they are a click or two away from your competition. And, with search traffic being driven toward sites with better engagement and greater social sharing, those quickly-departing visitors will affect future traffic as well.

Here are a few visitor experience land mines that I’ve encountered in the last month. […]

By |November 26th, 2013|

Need More Sales and Leads? Google Wants to Help!

 
For most attendees of Pubcon Las Vegas, the best part of Matt Cutts’s keynote was his measured and nearly genial response to the previous day’s attack on both him and Google by Internet entrepreneur Jason Calacanis. Cutts heads up Google’s Web spam team, and Calcanis blames Google for destroying his Mahalo.com business when they launched their Panda update. The update targeted content farms, sites that generated large quantities of low quality content optimized for search. […]

By |October 29th, 2013|

Blog Headline Writing Lessons from Mega-traffic Sites

What’s one of the most simple traffic building tools that even most top bloggers don’t use? Surprisingly, few bloggers take advantage of the ability to target a separate headline for people browsing the site and people searching via Google, Bing, etc.. […]

By |September 17th, 2012|

What Guy Kawasaki Knows About Google+, and You Don’t

Book Review: What the Plus! Google+ for the Rest of Us by Guy Kawasaki

Google+ seemed to get off to a running start, but more recently has been termed a “ghost town” by some pundits. Experience with the service suggests less than robust usage by consumers, despite the large number of registered users. When my Why Jersey Shore Drops the National IQ post went mildly viral last week, it quickly garnered more than a thousand Facebook likes, but a mere five +1s. Does this mean Google+ is headed the way of Friendster and MySpace? […]

By |March 26th, 2012|

Brain Movies: Top 5 Super Bowl Ads

Everyone loves to rank Super Bowl ads, and one neuromarketing firm that did so is Sands Research (see Super Bowl 2010 Ad Winners. Sands uses a combination of EEG, eye-tracking, biometrics, and surveys to calculate a “neuro-engagement factor” […]

By |March 1st, 2010|