Quantcast

10 New Episodes of the Brainfluence Podcast

Time really does fly – it seems like we just published our list of the first ten episodes of The Brainfluence Podcast, and here we are with another ten! And if you aren’t getting our weekly episodes delivered to your player automatically, be sure to subscribe! […]

By |August 28th, 2014|

Instant Neuroscientist, Just Add Boot Camp

Have you always wanted to earn that degree in neuroscience, but never had the time? The University of Pennsylvania has just the thing: their 2012 Neuroscience Boot Camp. No, you won’t actually get a degree. The program lasts just nine days. But, you will get a crash course in cognitive and affective neuroscience, and you’ll be a lot more brain-savvy after the intense classwork. As Penn puts it, attendees will become “informed consumers of neuroscience research.” […]

By |December 26th, 2011|

The Neuromarketing of Burgers

There’s hardly a shortage of places to buy hamburgers in the US, but the restaurant chain Five Guys has opened 300 stores in the last five years, and has contracts for many more. Locally, I’d been hearing about the fantastic hamburgers and fries at Five Guys for months, and finally ventured inside to see what has allowed the chain to grow in a seemingly saturated market. What I found were very good burgers and even better applied neuromarketing. In one short visit, I saw a variety of different techniques, most of which I’ve written about in past posts: […]

By |October 15th, 2009|

Training Your Brain to Multitask

It’s Monday, your inbox is full of unanswered emails, you desk is piled high with paper, and you’ve got a couple of important project deadlines looming. There’s one bright spot: although past research has indicated that people’s ability to multitask, i.e., perform several tasks at once, is very limited, a new study shows one can improve multitasking ability with training. First, the bad news: […]

By |August 24th, 2009|

Neuroscience and Magic

Magic tricks have entertained people for centuries, if not millenia. They startle and surprise the audience because the trick generally accomplishes something that appears to be impossible – a ball disappears when tossed in the air, a tiger materializes in an empty cage, and so on. Most magic tricks exploit limitations in human perception: when we are watching the magician’s right hand, we think we know what his left hand is doing but more than likely our brains are simply filling in the blanks for us. Surprisingly, until recently scientists have largely ignored the insights into perception and cognition offered by magic. It turns out that understanding why magic tricks work may help both neuroscientists and even marketers. […]

By |August 3rd, 2008|