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The 3 Types of Buyers, and How to Optimize for Each One

[Guest post by Jeremy Smith.]

I absolutely love buyer psychology and neuroeconomics. Want to know why?

● Because it’s like a secret weapon that produces torrents of conversions (and money).
● Because it’s the only real way to understand why and how buyers make purchases.
● Because it’s the proven route to successful marketing.
● Because it’s guaranteed to squash the competition. […]

By |July 30th, 2014|

Bad Boys (and Girls) Behave Badly

Who cheats on their taxes? While the first answer that pops to mind might be “everyone,” about 15% of Americans admitted to doing so in an interesting study by DDB Worldwide Communications Group. (In a separate survey, 85% of Americans were found to be liars. Just kidding.) Single men made up 64% of the cheater group. What I found interesting about this study’s data was the clustering of bad behavior. Look at these stats comparing the cheaters and non-cheaters willingness to engage in other behaviors: […]

By |March 31st, 2011|

Five Ways to Sell in a Bad Economy

Some of my more popular posts over time have been those dealing with selling to two different customer groups: spendthrifts, who spend money freely, and tightwads, who don’t part with their money easily. (See Five Keys to Selling to Spendthrifts, Tightwads, Spendthrifts, and Everyone Else and Five Keys to Selling to Tightwads).

It’s safe to say that for the last few years, it was far more productive for marketers to target spendthrifts. In our overheated consumer economy, spendthrifts were a much more lucrative target than tightwads who had to be convinced to part with their cash. Now, though, we are all thinking like tightwads – even those who are still well-employed may harbor nagging doubts about their financial future. In this environment, it’s worth re-looking at some neuromarketing tips to succeed in selling to tightwads: […]

By |February 19th, 2009|

Five Keys to Selling to Spendthrifts

Neuroeconomics research suggests that roughly 15% of your consumers are “spendthrifts” – they have unusually low sensitivity to the pain of paying, i.e., the neural discomfort associated with parting with money. Selling to people who feel little or no buying pain should be easy, right? With reduced buying inhibition, a spendthrift is more likely to take advantage of any given offer compared to a tightwad or even a normal, “unconflicted” person. Nevertheless, making the sale isn’t a given. For one, your offer is competing with other offers both for similar products or services as well as offers for dozens of other, unrelated items. Unless your spendthrift has the net worth of Bill Gates, he will have to make choices – as much as he might like to, he can’t buy everything. So, in our ongoing effort to translate academic neuroeconomics into practical neuromarketing, here are five ways to help close the deal with these free-spending customers: […]

By |October 9th, 2007|

Tightwads, Spendthrifts, and Everyone Else

Marketers love to segment their potential customers, and now there’s a new way to do it: spendthrifts, tightwads, and everyone else. Research at Carnegie Mellon University shows that 40% of consumers can be classified as either spendthrifts or tightwads, while 60% fall into a middle category without strong tendencies in either direction. Furthermore, this behavior is related to one of our favorite neuromarketing topics, buying pain. […]

By |October 1st, 2007|