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Building strong brands and brand personalities

Brands Count – Seen or Unseen

We’re in the midst of the busiest shopping season of the year, and lots of us will be shopping for stylish gifts. One of the choices we’ll be confronted with is whether to buy an item from a well-known brand or opt for a less expensive item from a store or cheaper brand. If we opt for the expensive brand, we have another decision – do we select an item with visible branding, like a Polo shirt or Gucci purse emblazoned with the brand logo? Or, do we choose an item that lets the recipient see the brand but which doesn’t expose the brand to others? […]

By |December 6th, 2012|

Latest Brainy Marketing at Forbes

It’s been a while since I recapped my Forbes Brainy Marketing activity here, so here’s what you may have missed. And, be sure to add a comment if you visit. I can “call out” quality comments, and site admins sometimes expose these in different parts of the site. […]

By |October 26th, 2012|

Brainy Marketing Update – Forbes

It’s been a few weeks, so here are the latest articles from my Brainy Marketing blog at Forbes.com. Please drop by there and make a comment – Forbes has a cool comment exposure system that lets authors of posts (e.g., me) “call out” quality comments, and the site admins often expose these comments on other pages, like the front pages of sections like CMO Network, Leadership, etc. I enjoy the smart dialog you create here, and at Forbes you’ll be able to interact with a whole new group of thinkers and thought leaders! […]

By |August 23rd, 2012|

The End of Brainwashing

Here’s a story within a story, and it begins and ends with my (mostly virtual) friend Brian Solis, author of The End of Business as Usual. Solis began things by posting a photo of my book on Posterous, […]

By |August 17th, 2012|

Consumer Neuroscience: Neuromarketing Rebranded?

No, I’m not rebranding my blog Neuromarketing. But, with my broad focus on an all-encompassing definition of neuromarketing, I may be part of what some perceive as a problem – a too-inclusive use of the term. The biggest firm in the neuromarketing space, Nielsen’s NeuroFocus unit, is trying to sharpen the distinction between research approaches that use direct brain activity measurements (NeuroFocus uses EEG) and those that use techniques like biometrics, facial coding, and behavior metrics. […]

By |August 10th, 2012|

Brainy Marketing at Forbes

Neuromarketing readers should check out my new blog on the CMO Network at Forbes.com, Brainy Marketing. The first post is kind of an introduction, Marketing: It Really IS Brain Surgery! […]

By |June 12th, 2012|

Why Business is Different Now

People toss around the terms "thought leader" and "social media expert" lightly these days, but Brian Solis is one of the few people who actually lives up to those names. In The End of Business as Usual, Solis shows how the widespread use of social media is fundamentally changing the business environment.

By |June 6th, 2012|

Does Your Domain Say “Trust Me?”

Do web searchers pay attention to the domain where the link in the search results leads them? A few years ago, I would have said “no.” For years, I’ve operated or advised websites that ranked at or near the top for various brand names, and found many users assumed the site WAS that brand. Even the most cursory look at either the domain or the site itself would show the site to be unaffiliated with the brand, but oblivious visitors would post inquiries about customer service problems, purchase locations, and so on.

Now, it seems, more web searchers are paying attention to what’s in the URL. […]

By |May 9th, 2012|

Are Marketers Sleazy?

One of the common questions I’m asked at conferences and by reporters is whether neuromarketing techniques are ethical, or whether they are just one more way to manipulate consumers into buying stuff they don’t need. My response to […]

By |April 20th, 2012|

Love/Hate: Why Disliked Brands Prosper

Something brand owners strive for is that elusive magic of being loved by consumers. Brands like Apple, Google, Southwest Airlines, and others have earned enduring positive regard among consumers, and those companies outdo their peers in part because of the brand equity they have built. But what about brands people don’t like? Oddly, some of those survive quite nicely and even prosper. […]

By |April 5th, 2012|