American Idol, Neuromarketing-Style

Fox Broadcasting’s secret weapon is out in the open: neuromarketing. The media firm has announced the extension of its two-year partnership with Innerscope Research, Inc. In order to assist Fox advertisers, the partnership with Innerscope will provide, “biometric engagement measures for on-air and cross-platform promotions, with the introduction of a new Innerscope model for understanding advertising and content effectiveness.”

Innerscope will employ its “Brand Immersion Model,” a framework based on “the unconscious measures of emotion using biometrics, neuroscience and eye tracking.” From the press release:

“We’ve seen repeated confirmation through various ROI measures that television’s role in building brands and influencing other media is unequaled,” said Jon Nesvig, President of Sales for Fox Broadcasting Company. “With Innerscope, we hope to take our knowledge and the industry’s understanding of the science behind consumers’ connection to media and brands further, and in the process, work with our clients to plan and utilize television and cross-platform promotions to their best effect.”

Innerscope’s Brand Immersion Model developed from four years of research into how consumers interact with content on different platforms. The model accounts for the complex intersection of environment, content engagement, screen size, platform approach and flexibility, as well as how these factors affect the creation of emotional connections to brands. It will deliver to advertisers groundbreaking insights that will help optimize content in any platform.

FOX has commissioned an industry-level study that leverages the model to examine the role of unconscious emotional response in branded entertainment, product integrations and creative optimization across platforms.

In the past, Fox and Innerscope have collaborated on the hit show, American Idol, and other projects. The Fox property I’d really like to see a neuromarketing study for is 24; how do viewers’ biometrics react to Jack Bauer taking a blowtorch to a bad guy, and how do ads placed near that content fare?

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Roger Dooley writes and speaks about marketing, and in particular the use of neuroscience and behavioral research to make advertising, marketing, and products better. He is the primary author at Neuromarketing, and founder of Dooley Direct LLC, a marketing consultancy. Follow him on Twitter.

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2 responses to "American Idol, Neuromarketing-Style" — Your Turn

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Megan Zuniga 17. May 2010 at 3:54 am

Honestly? I think if they placed an ad whenever Jack is torturing someone, I doubt anyone would notice the ad. But I do know that cellphones or gadgets are very noticeable in 24. Back when I used to watch, I remember wanting a cellphone just like Jack’s. Oh, and let’s not forget that the signature ring tone of CTU became famous and most people started using it as ring tone. Now, that I think about it, it’s kinda brilliant.

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Roger Dooley
Twitter: rogerdooley
17. May 2010 at 7:06 am

The effect of intense programming on adjacent ads has always been of interest – would you really want to buy a brand of detergent that interrupted Schindler’s List with an ad, for example?

On the other hand, our brains tend to form longer-lasting memories when aroused by fear or other strong emotions.

Roger

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