It’s short notice, but I just ran across the info at the Neuroethics & Law Blog. On Friday, March 10, 2006, Stanford University will host Reading Minds: Lie Detection, Neuroscience, Law, and Society. Here’s a brief summary:

A revolution in neuroscience has vastly expanded our understanding of the human brain and its operations. Our increasing ability to monitor the brain’s operations holds the possibility of being able to detect directly a person’s mental state. One of the most interesting possible applications is using neuroscientific methods to provide reliable lie detection. Several scientists, and several companies, claim that this use has arrived. The morning session of the conference will examine the scientific plausibility of reliable lie detection through neuroscientific methods, discussing different methods and assessing their likely success. The afternoon session will assume that at least one of those methods is established as reliable and will then explore what social and legal ramifications will follow. This conference is free and open to the public but advance registration is required.

This fascinating conference is free, but you must register. Wish I could say, “See you there!”, but I won’t be able to attend. :(

email