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Study Maps Emotions by Body Part

Researchers at Finland’s Aalto University have produced a set of images showing where in their bodies people experience different emotions. Their news release states,

For example, anxiety may be experienced as pain in the chest, whereas falling in […]

By |January 3rd, 2014|

CMU Study Identifies Emotions from Brain Activity

One of the ongoing controversies in neuromarketing is how well current techniques can identify specific emotions. While there’s general agreement that attention and emotional engagement can be tracked, identifying specific emotions with confidence has been elusive. Now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have published a new study showing the ability to identify emotions with an accuracy “well above chance” using fMRI. […]

By |July 2nd, 2013|

Cultural Differences in Reading Faces

The hottest new thing in neuromarketing is facial coding – the reading of fleeting facial expressions to determine true emotional reaction. Although the concept isn’t new – it dates to Paul Ekman’s groundbreaking research in the 1950s to 1970s – the ability to capture and interpret facial expressions automatically with simple cameras and even webcams is driving the new interest. Big companies like Coca Cola and Unilever are adopting the technique as standard (see Neuromarketing: For Coke, It’s the Real Thing), and the technology is being made available to companies of any size by firms like Affectiva and YouEye. […]

By |March 15th, 2013|

The Best of Neuromarketing – 2011

Once again, it’s time for the “Readers’ Choice” Neuromarketing picks for the year. These posts aren’t my own choices, but are selected because they garnered the most traffic from tweets, Facebook shares, Stumbleupon clicks, and so on. […]

By |December 21st, 2011|

Don’t Sell, Seduce!

Emotional ads are processed quite differently by the brain than those that appeal to logic, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology and Economics shows that . That might seem like old news to Neuromarketing readers, but the experimental approach was somewhat different than past efforts in this area. Researchers at UCLA had subjects view different ads, some that used logical persuasion to sell, and others that used what they called “non-rational influence” ads. The latter used mostly images, often of attractive people. (All ads were real ads, though not necessarily currently in use.)When the experimenters monitored the subjects’ brain activity using a form of EEG called low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography, they found that the information-laden logical ads did light up more of the brain, including both areas associated with decision making and emotions. […]

By |October 12th, 2011|

Apologies Really DO Work

Have you ever annoyed a potential customer, or made her angry? Before you decide to ignore the faux pas and press forward with the pitch, or write her off and move on to greener pastures, try this simple technique: say, “I’m sorry.” That’s likely instinctive behavior for many of us, but at times it may seem easier to call no further attention to your words or action that aggravated the prospect. Doing nothing is the wrong call, research shows. […]

By |July 14th, 2011|

The Upside of Irrationality by Dan Ariely

Nobody is doing more to add to our knowledge of the irrational side of human behavior than Dan Ariely. Not only does he conduct experiments that are elegant in their simplicity, but he writes about his work and that of other researchers in a highly acccessible way. Upside is the successor to the bestselling Predictably Irrational, and it takes to new topics, ranging from CEO pay to speed dating.

By |July 12th, 2011|

Creepy Robot Babies, Plastic Receptionists

Here’s more evidence that inanimate objects can spark human emotions… In Japan, testing of a robot baby called “Babyloid” has been completed and commercial production is set to begin. The purpose of the baby-bots is to engage the emotions of senior citizens, and in particular those with depression who would most benefit from “human” interaction: […]

By |March 3rd, 2011|