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Con-Artist Persuasion, Politics Breaks Brains, More… Roger’s Picks

Your weekend reading list for all things brain and marketing-related… […]

By |September 26th, 2014|

Color Psychology, Mind-Controlling Bugs, Blog Boosters, More… Roger’s Picks

You want an eclectic reading list? This week we’ve got color psychology, mind-controlling bugs, big conversion tips, neuro-politics, business blog boosters, and more! […]

By |August 22nd, 2014|

Santorum’s Test, and Why Conflict is Good

Rick Santorum, as most people now know after his surprisingly strong finish in the Iowa caucuses, is one of the of candidates seeking the Republican presidential nomination. Recently, Santorum responded to a question about who he’d place in […]

By |January 5th, 2012|

Neuromarketing Explains Weiner’s Pickle

The latest news on the lewd messaging scandal involving Congressman Anthony Weiner (Democrat, NY) was that he called former President Bill Clinton (who officiated at Weiner’s wedding) to apologize for his behavior. No transcript of the conversation was released, but it must have been an interesting chat. Did the ex-pres say something like, “Dude, I totally get it! They were hot!”? Both of these men engaged in behavior that, when exposed, seemed incredibly risky and stupid. […]

By |June 9th, 2011|

Why Politics is Hard

If you were asked to judge a policy proposal for addressing a social issue, which would be more important to you, the content of the proposal or the party that wrote it? Most of us would answer that the […]

By |August 20th, 2010|

French Appoint Neuromarketing Skeptic

Have the French appointed a neuromarketing skeptic as a special neuroscience advisor? It seems so. First, this news item: […]

By |June 1st, 2010|

Are Political Views Hard-wired?

We know that political marketing – the art of persuading voters to support your candidate – is perhaps the most challenging and least productive form of marketing. A couple of years ago in The Neuroscience of Political Marketing, I described how research shows that political ads seem to go through an “emotional filter” that, in essence, causes voters to discount messages that are inconsistent with their current beliefs. Thus, an accusation that one’s favored candidate took money from special interest groups is likely to be dismissed as a partisan smear rather than evaluated rationally. If that wasn’t enough to frustrate political marketers, there’s now sketchy evidence that our political views may be determined by more fundamental brain wiring attributes. […]

By |September 19th, 2008|