Browsing Tag

engagement

Social Media Tops TV

Could social media ads, or at least ads on Facebook, outperform similar ads on television? It seems the answer is "yes." That surprising outcome was reported in the same study that showed ads on the social media giant being more emotionally…

It’s Super Bowl Brain Scan Time!

Lots of people look forward to the Super Bowl. While most eagerly anticipate the on-field action, a significant portion of the game's TV viewers pay more attention to the ads. (If you are reading this, you are likely one of the latter!)…

Brain Movies: Top 5 Super Bowl Ads

Everyone loves to rank Super Bowl ads, and one neuromarketing firm that did so is Sands Research (see Super Bowl 2010 Ad Winners. Sands uses a combination of EEG, eye-tracking, biometrics, and surveys to calculate a "neuro-engagement…

Your Brain on Soup

Soup is a product you probably don't lust for. Sure, a hot bowl of soup is nice after a chilly job of shoveling snow out of the driveway, but rarely is it more than an afterthought, or a quick prelude to a more interesting main course. If…

Start Me Up: Brilliant Billboard

Billboards can be an effective medium, but tend to be very low in viewer engagement. Most outdoor advertising is designed to be viewed in a second or less as motorists whiz by. Here's an example of how one advertiser turned that idea…

Neuromarketing at Microsoft

Video games and movies are one of the more interesting neuromarketing applications, in that the technology can be applied to not just advertising but the product itself. A new effort by Microsoft and Emsense carries that idea one step…

Measuring TV Program Engagement

One of the problems with measuring the viewership of television programming is that counting viewers doesn't give advertisers or programmers any information about how engaged the viewers are with the content. Two Australian firms, PBL…

Better Branding with Chocolate and Sex

Fantasizing about food and sex can reduce pain. (And you always thought those fantasies were a waste of time...) People in emotional or physical distress often turn to "comfort foods" - new research shows that just thinking about these…