Browsing Tag

memory

Flattery: A Free Way to Increase Recall

We know that flattery, a form of social reward, is a powerful tool. In Flattery Will Get You Somewhere, we saw that complimenting an individual made them feel more positively about the person bestowing the favorable comments, even when they…

Social Media Tops TV

Could social media ads, or at least ads on Facebook, outperform similar ads on television? It seems the answer is "yes." That surprising outcome was reported in the same study that showed ads on the social media giant being more emotionally…

Fancy Fonts Boost Recall

If you want someone to remember your information, should you use a simple, easy to read font or one that is more complicated and difficult to read? Most people would guess that simplicity is best; after all, we know that simple fonts…

The Invisible Gorilla

Review: The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us, by Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons Before reading farther, watch this video if you haven't already seen it: The Invisible Gorilla provides an interesting…

Use Your Cell Phone, Save Your Brain

Neuromarketing readers know I sometimes venture into the non-marketing area of brain fitness, and I couldn't resist passing along this bit of research on cell phone use. For years, we've been hearing alarming claims that cell phone use…

First-time Scents are Memorable

We know that smells can evoke memories - think Proust's madeleine - but new research shows that first-time scents seem to merit a unique status in our brains. The researchers used fMRI imaging to judge how well people paired scents and…

Caffeinated Branding: Think Inside the Cup

Way back in 2005, in Can Caffeine Brain Boost Help Ad Recall?, I suggested that Starbucks could sell potent ads on their cups. This idea, though tongue-in-cheek in nature, was based on fMRI research that showed caffeine stimulated areas of…

The Hungry Customer

Food marketers love hungry customers as they are certainly in a state where tantalizing images may be particularly effective. Oddly, it turns out that hungry people may take in all kinds of information more quickly. The New York Times…