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olfactory marketing

Why You Need a Scent Logo

How can you get customers to remember your brand with all this clutter? The surprising answer is through the sense of smell. The sense of smell is the only one of our five senses that is directly connected to the part of the brain that…

More Senses, Higher Sales

What two senses get all the attention in advertising? Sight and sound. Print, broadcast, and digital media usually reach only these two, and often just one. In his new book, About Face, Dan Hill spends some time focusing on how reaching…

When Marketing Stinks

Olfactory marketing has been used for years, and usually the objective is to use appealing scents and create a positive branding message. Not always, though - one politician is conducting a campaign that, well, stinks. Carl Paladino, the…

Scent Nearly Doubles Sales

Finnish scent marketing firm Ideair used ten restaurants and bars to conduct an interesting test of the effect of scent on product sales. As reported by Reuters, five locations used only visual ads for a specific liquor brands while the…

Scent of a Billboard

Outdoor sign makers are trying hard to stay relevant as the era of targeted mobile advertising approaches, and their latest move is to add scent. In Mooresville, NC, a billboard has been erected that, for parts of the day, emits the smell…

Scent Increases Product Recall

Would you prefer a scented pencil? How about a tennis ball? Tires? You might not care, or even prefer to avoid the olfactory assault altogether, but research shows you'll remember the product better if it has a scent.

Neurons That Fire Together Wire Together

One of the key factors in the human brain's ability to change via neuroplasticity is that neurons form interconnections based on simultaneous firing over a period of time. According to Norman Doidge, author of The Brain That Changes…

First-time Scents are Memorable

We know that smells can evoke memories - think Proust's madeleine - but new research shows that first-time scents seem to merit a unique status in our brains. The researchers used fMRI imaging to judge how well people paired scents and…