Do You Tweet Motivational Quotes?

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Motivation

Do you tweet inspirational or motivational quotes?

I don’t. In my opinion, but there’s enough noise and clutter on Twitter already. I try to limit my tweets to:

  • Sharing useful content (both my own and good stuff from others).
  • Personal interactions.
  • Occasionally, things I find unusually odd or funny.

Who are these people that tweet endless streams of quotes from Ben Franklin, Gandhi, and Mark Twain? And why do they have enough time to place them on pictures of clouds or mountains?

Do you tweet motivational quotes? Why? #twitter pic.twitter.com/7Rk3ef6q2Z Click To Tweet

In case you are wondering, I created the graphic with this post at Despair.com, a hilarious site that skewers the motivation industry. Feel free to share the image if you agree with the sentiment. If you are a nice person (like almost all of my Neuromarketing readers), you’ll link back to this page when you share it.

In fact, here’s ready-made embed code I got from another helpful site, Sieger Media:

Naturally, I’ll close with a quote… from Despair.com:

If a pretty poster and a cute saying are all it takes to motivate you, you probably have a very easy job… the kind robots will be doing soon.

Are your motivational quote tweets really motivating? #twitter pic.twitter.com/7Rk3ef6q2Z Click To Tweet

Do you tweet motivational quotes? Do you read quotes and flag inspirational quotes as favorites? Or, worse, add to the clutter by retweeting them? Leave a comment with your own thoughts…

10 Comments
  1. Elaine Fogel says

    Roger, I have a pet peeve for quotes! Frankly, they are a pain in the butt. Let’s ban them. 🙂

    1. Roger Dooley
      Twitter: rogerdooley
      says

      I prefer to hear from the person tweeting, not Mark Twain or Ben Franklin. I won’t unfollow someone for the occasional quote, but I’ve seen some tweet streams that are mostly quotes. Lazy.

    2. Linda says

      May I quote you on that? ?

  2. Mary Cole says

    Roger Roger Roger… ouch. Some people tweet to build business. Others tweet just to share. Whether that is sharing something inspirational (ouch again) or surprising (new science stuff) or adorable (yeah, those kitty/animal pictures, etc.) maybe we’re just in the mood to share. Maybe Twitter is our yellow sticky pad. I’m involved with a surgical instrument business right now and I come across a lot of things I think people might benefit from reading; and sometimes people thank me because it’s exactly what they needed at the moment. I think that’s what we look to do: share a valuable thing at the right moment to somebody who will connect with it. If people don’t like the stream of tweets, they can always unfollow. And we can always search for information on a specific topic. So let’s get on with life. Enjoy.

    1. Roger Dooley
      Twitter: rogerdooley
      says

      I do unfollow mad quoters, Mary, though my threshold has gone up from a single spotted quote. I used to scan my timeline for quotes and immediately unfollow the tweeters. I don’t have the time to do that these days, but when I spot a serial quote abuser… 😉

  3. James says

    Personally, I love quotes.
    To me, done well,
    they are potent hits of philosophy, poetry and humour [brit. sic] passed down thru the ages.
    Further, I enjoy knowing quotes that people I admire enjoy
    p r o v i d e d, they are neither cliché nor all the author has to say.

  4. Anthony W. Eichenlaub says

    Motivational quotes don’t bother me unless there are way too many of them in my Twitter feed. Actually, TweetDeck lets me filter out retweets, so really I only see originals most of the time.

    Mock motivational images are always welcome, though. I don’t retweet them usually, but I always read them.

  5. Pratik says

    I like Motivational quotes so much which refresh your mind i guess

  6. Steffen Eckart says

    Interesting discussion. I have seen the advice that sharing motivational quotes on twitter is one technique to build followers, provided the content is relevant to you what you normally post. I agree that cliches from Ben Franklin or Mark Twain don’t have much of a place on Twitter unless you are a historian. But a concise phrase that captures an idea in a fresh way is certainly fair game.

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